Alternative options for Carbohydrates….

How in the world do you replace high-carb foods with carb-friendly food ?

Here are some great substitutes for some of our favorite foods.

  • Pasta – Zucchini noodles, spaghetti squash, shirataki (konjac) noodles
  • Rice- cauliflower rice
  • Apples, Bananas, Oranges- Berries
  • Potatoes- Mashed Cauliflower
  • Milk and Soy milk – unsweetened almond milk or cashew milk
  • Pizza – Fat head Pizza ( recipe below)
  • Bread- Lettuce wraps, Low- carb cassanava tortillas
  • Chips – Pork rinds, cheese whips carb free chips
  • Candy bars- Chocolate sweetened with stevia or monk fruit
  • Peanuts- Macadamia nuts or almonds
  • All -purpose and whole wheat flour- Almond flour, coconut flour, hazelnut flour
  • Sugar- stevia, xylitol (from birchwood), erythritol, monk fruit
  • cornstarch – arrowroot powder or xanthin gum
  • yogurt – coconut milk or almond milk unsweetened.

FAT HEAD DOUGH

This type of dough is often referred to as a “fat head” dough, as the concept was invented by the creators of the documentary “Fat Head”

Heat oven to 425 F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. In a sauce-pan or toaster oven add mozzarella cheese. Heat in 30-second intervals, stirring between each one, until the cheese is very melty and stretchy.

Add the almond flour, baking powder, xanthin gum, and salt to the cheese. Fold into the cheese with the wooden spoon. Once the almond flour is completely incorporated, add the egg and mix until the dough is formed.

Turn the dough out onto a piece of parchment paper. Wet your hands with water and knead the dough until it is uniform in color. You should not see white or yellow spots throughout. Continue wetting your hands, as needed, to prevent sticking. the more you knead the dough, the easier it should be to manipulate.

Cut the dough into four parts. Roll the dough out on the parchment paper to your desired thickness and shape ( round for sandwich and long for breadstick. I think you get the idea. Put the dough onto a baking sheet. Bake until the tops are golden brown which is about 10-15 minutes.

1.5 cups shredded mozeralla

1 cup of almond flour

1.5 teaspoon baking powder

1/4 teaspoon xanthan gum

1/4 sea salt

1 beaten egg.

Give your Digestion a Break…

bone broth jars

Ok so you have almost survived the holidays. New Years is the last holiday, remember what I said in my old post about what to drink and how to prevent a hangover.

A great way to just give your body a break after all the sugar and rich food is give your digestion a small break. Try drinking broth for a day and a healthy light dinner loaded with veggies and lean meats.

Bone broth is a very powerful tool when it comes to your health. It will help heal leaky gut and repair damage to your intestinal wall.  The gelatin in the bone broth (found in the knuckles, feet, and other joints) helps seal up holes in intestines. This helps cure chronic diarrhea, constipation, and even some food intolerances. It also helps boost your immune system, which we all need this time of year.

Taking glucosamine supplements to help with joint pain has been common knowledge for years, but it turns out that bone broth has glucosamine too.  The chondroitin sulfate in bone broth has been shown to help prevent osteoarthritis. Bone broth will help reduce inflammation in your joints.

Bone broth is a good source of collagen. You can find collagen in all kinds of “plumping” products these days. It is way cheaper than Botox.

The phosphorus, magnesium, and calcium in the bones seeps out into the broth leaving you with the essential building blocks for healthy bones.

bone broth w words

BONE BROTH RECIPE

  • Whole organic chicken or 4 Large Grass Fed Beef Bones
  • 4 or more quarts of filtered water or about 1 inch above contents
  • ½ cup apple cider vinegar
  • 2 onions, coarsely chopped
  • 7 carrots,  chopped
  • 5 celery sticks, coarsely chopped
  • 2 Tablespoons of Thyme and Rosemary
  • Sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon dried green peppercorns, crushed or ground in pepper grinder
  • Fresh ginger root
  • 3 Bay leafs

Fill the bottom pot of a large stockpot with the onion, carrots, herbs, apple cider, celery, and ginger. Put the second pot on top and add the large peppercorn, bay leafs and the whole chicken. Fill the entire pot up with filtered water. Let the pot boil on high for 1.5-2 Hours until the chicken is cooked. Turn off the pot and pull out the chicken and let it cool. Once the chicken has cooled take all of the meat off the bone and throw the bones back into the top pot. Turn the stove on low and boil with a lid for 12 hours minimum. The longer the more intense the flavor will be. If you do not have a stockpot you can use a crock-pot. Drink UP!

 

NOTE: If you cannot make bone broth  many of the health foods store carry it in the frozen foods section. They have many varieties you will have to see what you enjoy the most or you can contact me personally for purchases of broth. 

 

 

 

I love My Salt Block + Recipe

I am sure you have heard about how great a salt lamp is for you right ?Have you heard of the benefits of the Himalayan pink salt block? It is my new favorite way to cook in the kitchen. My steaks, pork chops and salmon are amazing.   So hopefully I can convince you to pop on Amazon and order yourself a salt block with the information below.

The Himalayan pink salt block is catching on and for good reason. Not only do these colorful prehistoric crystals make healthier, tastier and more interesting meals, they’re also just darn pretty to look at! Not enough, you say? Who doesn’t want to cook on this beautiful block.

TOP TEN REASONS TO COOK ON A SALT BLOCK:

1. Adds Healthy Minerals To Food

2. More Complex Taste Than Table Salt

3. A Hint of Salt, Not A Lot

4. Naturally Anti-Microbial Surface

5. Extreme Temperature Resistance

6. Superior Heat Distribution

7. Holds Temperature Longer

8. Use Heated or Chilled

9. Food Cures Through Contact

10. Blocks Double As Serving Platters

Where To Buy Your New Himalayan Salt Block click the salt block below to change your world!!

Here is the First Recipe I used on my Salt block …yummy

Himalayan Salt Block Recipe – Seared Flank Steak

Flank steak has to be pretty much the best thing short of a foot rub while drinking a root beer float.  But it’s tough.  It’s ornery.  There is a common strategy to making the flank steak supple enough to eat without popping your jaw out of joint: marinating.  I’ve made coffee and ginger marinades, lime and tequila marinades, smoked salt and chili pepper marinades, vinegar and sugar marinades… you name it.  Every time, great steak.  But think of the poor steak.  A wonderful, flavor-packed piece of meat forced to suffer quietly the insult of subjugation to intense acids and sugars and salts.  When we see a flank steak, we see a quandary.  How do we get that elemental flavor out of a meat that resists the teeth?  There is a solution, a way honor the humble yet noble flank steak in its naked beauty, a way that takes virtually no preparation ahead of time, a way results in a fun, incredibly juicy and savory dish.

There are two simple tricks to this dish (if you can call steak seared on a giant block of salt a dish): cutting the meat against the grain, and cooking it at a high temperature.  Oh, and cooking it NOT on steel, but on a block of ancient, super dense, mineral rich Himalayan salt.

Ingredients:
1 2lb piece of flank steak
1 9x9x2 inch salt block

Place the block of Himalayan rock salt on the stove and set to low heat, gradually, over the course of 30 minutes, bringing it to high heat, until the block reaches a cooking temperature of 475 to 500 degrees F.  Cut the piece of flank steak length wise along the grain of the meat, creating two long strips.  Then, turning the piece perpendicular to the blade of your knife cut the strips across the fiber of the meat into 1/4 inch thick strips, each about 2 to 3 inches long.

When the Himalayan pink salt plate is hot, which you can tell by when a sample piece of meat sizzles vigorously (or however it is that a piece of meat sizzles when it is REALLY sizzling), or by moving your hand closer and closer to the hot Himalayan salt block until your hand definitely doesn’t want to get any closer at about 2 or 3 inches away, or by gunning it with one of those very cool infra-red thermometers and noting that it is 475 to 500 degrees F, you are ready to cook.

Flank steak sauteed on Himalayan Salt plates blocks bricks

Place about 12 pieces of steak onto the block.  After 15 to 20 seconds, flip and cook for another 15 to 20 seconds.  Serve immediately.

The major drawback to this dish is that no matter how fast you cook, you can generally eat faster.  I’ve noticed that when diners are hungry enough, it is possible to actually eat the entire pieces without chewing–sort of iguana style.  To avoid giving the impression that we are savages, we have conferred upon this dish a sophisticated name that distracts those we are trying to impress.  We call it bifsteak à l’iguanne.

Hence the name, steak a l’iguana.  A good way avoid just hovering over the stove wolfing down the hot, juicy, rare-on-the-inside, seared-golden-on-the-outside pieces of steak, is to bring the cooking to the table, where children can be controlled and adults are obligated to be civil.

Place the hot brick on a trivet and place the piping hot Himalayan salt brick on the table.  The block of Himalayan salt stores enough heat to allow for 3 to 5 courses.  (As the block cools, subsequent batches of steak will be saltier.)  And voilà, all the civility of a good fondue Bourguignonne with even better, more indubitably seasoned cooking.